Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Montrose Prepares To Spread Wings, Raise Roof

Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church renderings, 3511 Yoakum Blvd., WAMM, Houston, 77006

Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, 3511 Yoakum Blvd., WAMM, Houston, 77006A look at the latest plans for bulking up the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Cathedral on Yoakum Blvd. at Kipling St. come from the diagrams submitted with a recent variance request for the project (and a few more now up on the church’s website). For comparison, a reader sends some leafy shots of the cathedral at its current width, snapped a few days before the setup for the annual Houston Greek Festival (which wrapped up on the church’s campus for the 50th time yesterday evening).

The expansion would widen the 1952 cathedral building to the north and south (toward and away from Kipling), about doubling the current seating capacity; the design also adds that big dome to the top (while the smaller dome along the Yoakum-side bell tower would get a new nitrate finish stainless-steel top-off to match). The church submitted the request for a 1-ft. building line setback last month, including this drawing from Philip Johnson/Alan Ritchie architects (which shows a leaf-free perspective from the corner of Yoakum and Kipling):

***

Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church renderings, 3511 Yoakum Blvd., WAMM, Houston, 77006

Diagrams filed with the request show the oak at the corner of Yoakum being preserved, though a few new trees and light fixtures make an appearance on the Kipling side. The sketches also show some planned benches and landscaping:

Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church renderings, 3511 Yoakum Blvd., WAMM, Houston, 77006

Here’s the current state of Kipling, facing west toward Yoakum; some of the stained-glass windows on either side of the cathedral would be reused:

Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, 3511 Yoakum Blvd., WAMM, Houston, 77006

Images: Philip Johnson/Alan Ritchie Architects (renderings), Swamplot inbox (photos), Houston Planning Commission (variance diagram)

Toward the Heavens, To the Curb

4 Comment

  • It appears that they are converting it from a Latin cross to a Greek cross (symmetrical) design, with the dome above the cross as is typical in Greece/Eastern Europe. I’m surprised it was ever built with a Latin cross, unless it was formerly a Roman Catholic church. I may have to visit this place when done. Like to mix an Orthodox Mass in with my Catholic Masses from time to time.

  • I swear I saw plans for a new cathedral at one of the open houses held in conjunction with the Greek Festival years ago, maybe as long ago as 10 or 20 years. Are they just now getting around to it?

  • @Mike
    I am Catholic but I have family from Greece. The perceived differences between the the two religions are starker for the Orthodox and than for Catholics. They refer to themselves as “Christian” and to my church as “Catholic”. As far as they’re considered you might as well be Buddhist.

  • Hi Ioanna,
    That is interesting that your family views it that way. I have had Orthodox friends but none saw it in quite those terms. But they were all considerably educated and knew the similarities. I guess living for five centuries under the Ottoman Empire with no other Christians around you you develop kind of a shell. Good luck trying to build a bridge.